Glimpses #2: Belgium, Germany

Originally intended as a small book, “Glimpses: In which a Casual Traveler Ruminates on Passing Scenes—1989-2011″, I should like to share it with my readers in a more informal manner as a series of Blogs.. The introduction and first two “Glimpses” are in the Blog uploaded on October 2, 2016

rjs_at_dais

Belgium: Leuven: Walking off nervousness before I have to deliver a paper at an international conference hosted by KADOC at the Catholic University, I pass through the remnants of a gate in a stone wall on the town’s outskirts. How many walled towns does Europe contain? Was this one raised by the Franks who founded Leuven? Or, as so many seem to be, by the Romans? Why do we still feel we need walls? We’ve only replaced stone with ideologies.

The Dom in Cologne seen from the train

The Dom in Cologne seen from the train

Germany: Paris, to Cologne, Germany: We arrive at the train station at night after leaving Isabelle and Bertrand. Our first view of Cologne: The Dom lit up in bluish lights: an unforgettable, fantastic wedding cake fashioned over the years out of durable stone! And to think that during WWII we nearly bombed it into rubble! (Note: Isabelle and Bertrand Azema, a couple from France that we met in NYS while Bertrand worked at IBM and whom we visited in France).

This is a detail of the Dionysus Mosaic found at the Roman-German Museum in Cologne Germany

This is a detail of the Dionysus Mosaic found at the Roman-German Museum in Cologne Germany

This is a detail of the Dionysus Mosaic found at the Roman-German Museum in Cologne Germany

This is a detail of the Dionysus Mosaic found at the Roman-German Museum in Cologne Germany

Germany: Cologne: I discovered that this city’s name comes from the word ‘colony’ and was the northernmost settlement of the Romans on the Rhine River. A curious note: during WWII when the U.S. bombed this city, most all of it (97%) was razed, though they tried not to destroy its beautiful Dom. After cleaning up after the war, the Germans discovered that the bombs had unearthed long-buried remnants of the Roman presence: an almost wholly preserved mosaic floor, glass artifacts, chariot wheels and parts, etc. All now preserved in a Roman Museum nearby the Dom. What lies beneath Rome? And then?

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