Glimpses 5: Czech Republic, Germany, Switzerland, China

March 20, 2017

Originally intended as a small book, “Glimpses: In which a Casual Traveler Ruminates on Passing Scenes—1989-2011″, I should like to share it with my readers in a more informal manner as a series of Blogs accessible on our website. 

Coaster from U Fleku, Prague

Coaster from U Fleku, Prague

Czech Republic: Prague: Jacky, Jörg, take us to U Flecku, an incredibly old tavern some distance from the town’s center. Scarred wooden tables. Loud men-talk. Hearty laughter. Many mugs of Urquell disappeared from our table. How many dreams had been started, thwarted, and realized in this ancient beer hall? The following day, Cornelia and I visited the newly-opened Mucha Museum, while Jacky and Jörg explored elsewhere. (Note: We met Jacky Sparkowsky and Jörg Iwan in Berlin through the Jarczyks and have visited and traveled with them in Europe extensively).

Germany: Bergisch Gladbach: Walking back home with Heinz after a visit to his favorite art shop, we stop along the way at one of his favorite haunts — a small Italian restaurant where they warmly welcome him. Our order? An espresso and shot of grappa — enough to spur on at least an hour of small talk!

Germany: Leipzig: We find a tavern on the small square and see what we can get for lunch. As we sit at our table, I discover that this was the very place where Goethe wrote part of his “Dr. Faustus”. I try to conjure up his shade and absorb his spirit. All I come away with is the taste of beer. A short distance away, the church where Bach was choirmaster. My mind whirls with history.

 Switzerland: Somewhere in the Alps: Taking a short side trip on a local train from our Eurail route from Germany to Italy, we are in a carriage filled with young skiers. Rounding one mountain as we come from shade into full sunlight we unexpectedly come upon a sky filled with multi-colored hot air balloons, all sailing past our window at eye-level! Fantastic to see their tropical, parrot-like colors against the backdrop of snow-covered Alps!

China: Beijing (1999): A city of bicycles! (I hear that now they are rapidly being replaced by automobiles in China’s burgeoning economy. It was already a city of dense smog and pollution in 1999!). Beijing — A city of signs we cannot read!


Taking Stock

March 12, 2017
Cornelia Seckel in July of 1984 laying out Vol. 1 No. 1 of ART TIMES. The porch windows served as a light board.

Cornelia Seckel in July of 1984 laying out Vol. 1 No. 1 of ART TIMES. The porch windows served as a light board

Although, when Cornelia and I co-founded ART times back in 1984, we did not set ourselves up as a not-for-profit entity, we soon discovered that de facto, regardless of our intent, it would indeed be a not-for-profit enterprise. For the 30-odd years we’ve been in ‘business’, beyond keeping ‘afloat’ and meeting our basic needs, our income over expenses has been extremely modest. Lately, however, we’ve ended up “in the hole” (as, in fact, a great many publications and newspapers have been failing for the same reason in recent years), not covering our expenses for some time, periodically supplementing ART TIMES with loans from our modest savings when necessary to meet our obligations.

More than once over the years — and especially during the last few — we’ve been asked why we stay in business. We look at each other, at the questioners, and mostly just shrug. But, Yes! Why do we continue? Our answer sounds a little corny — even silly, perhaps — but to put it into one word, the answer always was and remains: altruism. The word, derived from the Latin alter, meaning “other” (cf. e.g. ‘alternate’, ‘alternative’, ‘alter ego’, etc.) was perhaps not in our minds at the time, but the truth of the matter is that neither of us were typical “businesspeople” — Cornelia was a teacher, counselor, and networker while I was a teacher, poet, and essayist. So “making money” — beyond a “living” — was not foremost in our thinking/planning/creating an ‘arts journal’. Our primary goal was to create a forum for the arts, specifically a publication that would further, bolster, promote and broadcast the cultural riches of our region — a project that Cornelia would physically “make happen” and that I would edit and contribute to. After putting together a mock-up to “float” out into the world in the early summer of 1984, Voila! Volume 1, No. 1 of ART TIMES came “hot off the press” in August. We did it! The “artworld” was pleased and readily supported its production from the outset. Our resultant travels to art exhibitions, conferences, lectures, museums and culture venues across not only America, but to Europe and Asia as well, became business expenses that not only contributed to the success of ART times but greatly enriched our (and our readers’) lives. We saw places and met people that we most likely would have never experienced if not for our creation of ART TIMES.

However, as ‘enriched’ as we felt culturally by being able to support our travels, we never thought of including a regular weekly “salary” for either one of us, content to get along on covering the basics of every-day living.

Cornelia Seckel and Raymond J. Steiner. A toast as the last ink on paper issue of ART TIMES is done.

Cornelia Seckel and Raymond J. Steiner. A toast as the last ink on paper issue of ART TIMES is ready to go to the printer.

Altruism, although admirable…even desirable…is, however, not quite cutting it lately. Our resources have been rapidly dwindling, and in the Summer of 2016, in an effort to “stop the bleeding” we moved from publishing in print to a digital-only presence; by doing so we not only eliminated our major costs of printing and shipping, but the move also resulted in our getting our advertisers out to a global audience.

Still, perhaps a little bit of ‘business sense’ would have been helpful back then when we sort of rashly took the plunge. Thankfully, our readers and supporters have rapidly responded to our situation and we are so grateful both for their encouraging words and advertising dollars. Any guesses of what’s on the horizon?


Glimpses 7: Germany Italy Ireland

March 2, 2017

Originally intended as a small book, “Glimpses: In which a Casual Traveler Ruminates on Passing Scenes—1989-2011″, I should like to share it with my readers in a more informal manner as a series of Blogs accessible from our website.

Germany: Berlin: Passing under the Brandenburg arch (there was a time in Imperial Germany when only the royals were allowed to pass under this arch) and strolling along “Unter den Linden” (how many times had I read about this famous street!) and then a trolley ride with Heinrich to the Eastern side only one year after the wall came down. As we ride past the uniformly gray and drab city, I see tears in Heinrich’s eyes. I am sorry that we insisted on going to “take a look” (old Berlin Gallows humor: Airline Stewardess: “Welcome to Schönenfeld Airport! Please set your watches back forty years!”) The Russians deliberately retarded improvements—you could still see bullethole-ridden walls everywhere—to punish the Germans for WWII. How many sad memories this country has! At one point we got off the trolley and walked a few streets, stopped at a small store to buy sandwiches. The woman who waited on us was obviously pleased that we stopped in, delighted to discover that we had come from America. As she wrapped our lunch, she asked if we had a “messer” (a knife) to cut our sandwiches. We shook our head “no” and she turned back to her counter to pick one up and carefully wrap it before she tucked it into our bag. We protested, but she insisted that it would come in handy later. We were touched; to have so little yet to be so willing to give away one of her utensils to us. And a surprisingly pleasant memory as well!

Italy: Cinqueterra: Eating fresh calamari on the Ligurian shore. Delicious! Back to Portofino later that day, walking the ‘pedinale’ up on the hill behind the town.

Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

Ireland: On the way through the Burrens to find the Cliffs of Mohrer, we get lost and stop to ask directions from a lone man walking the road. He speaks for several minutes while giving hand directions. Neither of us understood a word he said. We continue and find the cliffs on our own. Gusts off the Atlantic so strong that we could not stand upright — the wind got under one of my gloves and peeled it right off my hand! I would have lost it forever if I hadn’t grabbed it quickly. Wildly beautiful!

Northern Germany: On a houseboat trip through Germany’s northern lock-connected lakes a few years after the Wall came down in Berlin, we (Jacky, Jörg, Cornelia and I) dock at a small town on one of the larger lakes. At a gift shop I see caps on sale that read: “Middletown Police Department”! When I asked the lady behind the counter about them she said she knew nothing about the little town in upstate New York (a town in a neighboring county from where we live) or how the hats got to her store.

Germany: Malchow: On this same houseboat trip, when we came to the town of Malchow, there was a one mark “toll” to enter the town’s small harbor, the coin taken by a man on shore with a pouch at the end of a long flexible pole…what might he have done if we had ignored the small pouch dangling before our eyes?


Glimpses 6: Czech Republic, Italy, Germany, Japan

February 23, 2017

Originally intended as a small book, I should like to share it with my readers in a more informal manner as a series of Blogs accessible on our website.

Czech Republic: Prague: We walk across Karl’s Bridge with Jacky and Jörg and go to a restaurant under the abutments on the far side. Like walking into a grotto. Who had sat in my seat in the past? I can’t recall the food. The next day I find an art shop and buy a print of the bridge. It now hangs in my dining room and each time I look at it I am reminded of the restaurant, the castle up on the hill, and the artists working along the bridge. 

carrara

Carrara, as seen from the monument (bottom) in the center of town

Italy: Carrara: Cavi di marma loom, white marble glinting in the sun, the road narrow and twisty as we rise in our little rented car above San Pietro. At the end of the road, a small town — Colonnata —full of old men in the square, all with some visible disability (seemed like I was visiting some home/place for the disabled)..found out they were all local, hurt in accidents from their mining work. A monument honoring the men and the marble stands at the edge of town. Intermittent dynamiting disturbs the quiet little town. How difficult must it have been without modern technology during Michelangelo’s time!

Germany: Bergisch Gladbach: A small gathering at the home of Heinrich and Christiane Jarczyk celebrating Heinz’s 70th birthday, several of the people “new” to us, apparently friends and neighbors who were outside his artistic circle. At one point during the evening, an elderly gentleman, ramrod strait and very formal, remarked to me in a clipped and precise Oxford-English, “You call him Heinz?” “Yes,” I said somewhat lightly. “That’s his name.” The old man — I could picture him with a monocle and fencing scar — pulled back his head and said emphatically, “I know Herr Doktor Jarczyk for almost twenty years — and I do not call him (a slight hesitation here) ‘Heinz’.” I shrugged. “Well, I’m American, you see. We do not stand on such ceremonies. We are friends and he calls me ‘Ray’, and I call him ‘Heinz’.” I bowed slightly to his rigid glare and moved to take part in another nearby conversation. He did not deign to speak to me again for the rest of the evening.

Japan: Narita International Airport: On our departure flight from Japan to Beijing I was watching out my window as we taxied to our runway and noted a line of workers — baggage handlers? I was not sure, but they were all dressed in a white, work uniform — facing our plane and, as we taxied by, bowing deeply at the waist. I’d never seen anything like that and, to this day, do not know if it was a customary farewell to all airlines or was there perhaps some political VIP up in first class. Whatever, it was an extraordinary sight and strangely comforting to me as we took our leave.


Glimpses 4: Switzerland, Germany, Austria

February 19, 2017

Originally intended as a small book, “Glimpses: In which a Casual Traveler Ruminates on Passing Scenes—1989-2011″, I should like to share it with my readers in a more informal manner as a series of Blogs accessible on our website. The introduction and earlier blogs can be found in the archives.

Switzerland: Brenner Pass: While traveling from Germany to Italy, we passed some ski slopes and, I as I looked over at the Lodge at the bottom of the mountain, I noted a hospital nearby!!! How fitting! No wonder I never took up the sport!!

Ulm Minster

Ulm Minster

Germany: Ulm: a church steeple (the tallest in Europe) made of stone. From a distance, it looks like the finest of lace! How had those stonemasons performed this miracle? What artists they were! Did they impress God with their handiwork as He did them? And what did Einstein — who was born here — think of it? Makes one marvel at so many artists of today who make sure they sign their most trivial of “artworks”.

Austria: Vienna: Visited, of course, the Hof, the Albertina (big disappointment!), the Winter Riding School, Schönbrunn and other “tourist spots”, but it was a coffee house a few steps away from the Hofburg that I most remember: spacious, high-ceilinged, tables with ample room for waiters in black and white to glide between them, newspapers (none of which I could read) hanging from bamboo poles. It was midday yet most tables were occupied by readers and journal writers…a smattering of tourists like myself. I somehow felt the souls of departed novelists, memoirists, revolutionaries, poets, students, pamphleteers, professors, anarchists, and other disillusioned persons hovering nearby, looking over my shoulder and wondering why I was merely gawking and not writing.

Italy: Rome: Piero (Pier Augusto Breccia) takes us to a restaurant outside city limits: Rustic, ancient, overhead wooden beams hung with farm/hunting implements. The menu: wild game. Expecting wild animals, I was still surprised to see “Bambi” featured on the menu.

Germany: Bergisch Gladbach: It was May and not a time we usually go to Europe, but I was invited for a book discussion/signing for my monograph on Heinz (Heinrich J. Jarczyk: Toward a Vision of Wholeness) at Cologne’s Amerika Haus so our Spring visit was a special one. What made it even more memorable for me, was a stroll down the street on which the Jarczyks lived, each side lined with flowering plum trees, all in full bloom and the sidewalks covered in pink petals. It was almost like walking down a “red carpet”, the little town welcoming us as “super stars” from the U.S. A very nice memory indeed. (Note: I met Heinrich J. Jarczyk during his exhibition at the German Embassy in NYC and later wrote about him in ART TIMES; sometime later, I also wrote two books about his life and work. We visited (and became long-time friends) with him and his wife, Christiane, many times in Germany).


Global Warming

February 14, 2017

OK­­­, THEY’VE BEEN back ‘n forthing for some time now about this “global warming” stuff with no indication that they’ll ever reach agreement. Does this cause it? Or this? That? Wait a minute! Does it really even exist? Some claim that it’s simple science. Others, that it’s ‘junk’ science—or no science at all. Well what is it? Who ought we listen to? What ought we believe? Since it’s still “up in the air” (pun definitely intended) ought we care at all? And, if we should care who or what do we point our finger at. An industry? A person? T he truth is, folks, that the case for global warming has long been settled at least as far back as Nineteenth Century France—to be exact, during the heyday of the plein airistes. Any dedicated studio-encased painter could tell you way back then that it was those nutty outdoors ‘painters’ opening their toxic tubes of alizarin crimson, cadmium yellows, Prussian (i.e. ‘fascist’) blue and sap green being brazenly opened in the ‘pure’ light of day, contemptuously contaminating the atmosphere. Those committed indoor artistes were not taken in by the fancy label of plein airistes—they were unabashed polluters of our air and the real culprits of causing the global warming of our endangered planet. They even exported their evil abroad, the so-called “Hudson River School” in America, for example, avid followers of this misguided practice. Surely, we all are doomed to the inevitable curse of being made ‘toast’! So there! Hereby resolved! Fini!

colors

LET’S SAVE OUR PLANET AND BAN OUTDOOR PAINTING!


LET’S MAKE “GREAT” GREAT AGAIN!

February 7, 2017

WELL, HERE WE go again…some “visionary” wants to put his/her name on the world stage, engraving his/her name “in stone” for prosperity. We’ve been digging up such graven stones for some years now— even publicizing them in more modern ways such as “histories” written in print, for example — but the “posterity” business seems to constantly elude both givers and receivers of the message. In other words, the invariability of our having to re-live “history” because we ‘forget’ it. Would that our present-day pundits would read a book or two before declaiming their stupidities to the world at large. Such ‘mouthers’ — at times called “wise men”, or “prophets”, or “soothsayers” – even “oracles” — have plagued mankind for, lo, these many centuries, with their silly utterances. Oh, would that they pick up a book and read. Let alone our present “leader” and his proclamation of ‘greatening’ again (Oy! Another prophet! — Is that the sound of knickers twisting that I hear across the land?). Meanwhile we have to listen to another sooth-saying pundit announce to us that such proclamation sounds “Hitlerian”! Really! Read a book for gawd’s (or, better yet, our) sake! If anything, it simply sounds redundantly and embarrassingly human! Centuries before that dim-witted Austrian yelled “Deutschland uber Alles”ˆ, ancient egoists had been chanting similar absurdities thousands of years ago…and their predictions (“proclamations”, “warnings”, “fantasies” “greatness” claims, even “Divinity” at times ((really bad times))…whatever)…were as valid then as they still prove to be—namely, nothing but bulls—t.

Dreams of former “greatness” will undoubtedly not only plague Putin, but scores of new blowhards as well. You don’t think that Iran ever hearkens back to the Persian worldwide empire? Or Italy to its Roman Empire days? Or Greece (now one of the weakest/poorest members of the E.U.) to “back in the day”? How about France and the hey-day of Napoleon? Spain — when its tentacles reached across the Atlantic? Brits and their colonial “Empire”? And how about Native Americans and their attempts to hold sway over our blasphemous ‘immigrant’ pipelines? Let’s not even talk about the “religions” and their claims of coming “on from High.” Oh yeah! Let’s make America “great” again! As one former would-be ‘leader’ once said, “It depends on what the meaning of the word ‘great’ means” — or something like that.

How about we try this time to make our species “great”? That’s never been tried yet. Instead of trying to make our tribe “great”, how about we begin to make mankind great by learning something about our entire history? How about we take a long, hard look at that word “great” – or maybe even the word “human”?

READ A BOOK!